Life update

Just thought I’d do a quick update.  After successfully completing my curacy in Malvern, I applied and was accepted as the vicar of three churches just outside Pershore.  This has been a very exciting time for me as I have moved house and gained new friends.  The churches are all in very rural locations and so are quite small in their attendance but each are lovely in their own way.  I have been so thankful for the support I have received.

You may have noticed that most of my posts are missing.  Well, I thought a new life deserved a new blog.  I will still keep posting my sermons when I can.  Recording myself has been difficult as I no longer have the use of pulpits to rest my iphone on.  I’ve been trying to use a mic instead but this has been a bit cumbersome.  Anyway, this meant I didn’t record my first Christmas sermons which I’m a bit sad about as what I said was nothing like what I have written down!  BTW, despite being really ill, I had a fantastic Christmas!

I’m now looking forward to what God has in store for the churches in which I serve.

I hope you all are having a wonderful Christmas and wish you a happy new year!

Emma

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Bible sunday

United 4 Benefice Service 11am St Peters, Flyford Flavell. HC.
Col 3.12-17, Matt 24.30-35.

Listen along!

 

Today in the churches calendar we mark Bible Sunday. On this last Sunday in October, this date also coincides with reformation Sunday observed in the Lutheran tradition. When I visited Germany last year as part of the diocese curate exchange program, the Lutheran churches were busy preparing to celebrate the 500-year anniversary of Luther nailing his 95 these on the door of the Castle church. The day for celebration will be this Tuesday the 31st in Wittenburg, eastern Germany and they are expecting thousands, if not millions of visitors.

Luther’s most important theological contribution was the idea of the priesthood of all believers. He firmly believed that ordinary people should have the chance to read often and well in order to understand the faith. Luther broke away from the tradition of writing in Latin and instead used the language of the common tongue much to the distaste of the Papacy. Thanks to Luther’s translation of the Bible, it became possible for German-speaking people to stop relying on church authorities and instead read the Bible for themselves. Luther argued that ordinary people were not only capable of interpreting the scriptures for themselves, but that in doing so they stood the best chance of hearing God’s word. He wrote, “Let the man who would hear God speak read Holy Scripture.”

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Cassocks – A guide to

So in prep for Cuddesdon in September I have received a welcome pack.  Apparently a black cassock is required and a surplice.  So after discussing across twitter and various priests, this is my definitive* guide!  Remembering a good cassock will last 20 yrs – so some thought is needed!

First I need to point out that many Ordinands borrow a cassock during training or buy second-hand.  I have chosen not to do that as I am short and the likelihood of borrowing one that fits is low!  Also, I have been lucky enough to have my Diocese pay for my Cassock out of the end budget for clergy wear.  I do not know if this is the norm but as I am the only f/t ordinand my diocese is sending this year I may be a ‘special’ case.

Where to buy

  • www.jandmsewing.com  Ask around and you’ll soon be told that J&M are the best around for quality, cost and service. I’ll be ordering mine from them! Also, in the USA they are considered to be ‘high end’! 😉 Also Ordinands get a discount or a free Preaching Scarf when ordering a surplice with their cassock!

Others are:

  • www.wippell.co.uk V Expensive. I ordered a Cassock Alb from them and it was ok although the buttons had to have extra attention as they were not tied securely.  Men biased.
  • www.vanpoulles.co.uk – I bought a travel bag from these as, at the time, I could not find a better /cheaper one. Expensive overall.
  • www.hfltd.com Hayes and Finch. www.mccfs.com Mary Collins. www.wattsandco.com Watts and Co. And Ebay! Yes really! There are others but none of these I have ordered from.

Cassock Features – or Symbolism of pleates, collars, buttons (all entirely down to taste)

Pleates

  • 5 pleates on the back = Five wounds of Christ. (St Stephens House requirement). Has good ‘swing’ but not gd for the ladies who worry about “does my bum look big in this ?”.
  • 3 pleates = Trinity (My choice due to above and suggested for women).
  • 1 pleates = No meaning (unless you know different?!)
Pleates

Pleates

Collars

  • Rounded = Catholic or Anglo-C, so ‘High church’. Also longer wearing and more comfortable. (My choice.)
  • Square = Middle church. (there must be a better way to describe ‘other than high church’.
  • No gap in collar = Ordinand awaiting priesting.  So altered to include gap later at extra cost.
  • No collar = Come fly with me High in the Sky Church.
  • Gap size = Personal preference but the average seems to be 3cm. But rounded collars usually come with 1 inch (2cm) gap.
Collar

Rounded collar

Square Collar

Square Collar

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buttons on Single breasted

  • 39 = Represents the 39 Articles of the Church of England and/ or the stripes of our Lord’s Scourging (40 -1).  (My Choice)
  • 33 = Represents Christ’s earthly years (Tends to worn by RC priests or those too short to wear 39 who’ll then get evenly placed)

Pockets

  • J&M have the choice of a pen Pocket or Jackey type inside Pocket. (I chose neither).
  • You can have normal pockets or slit through or one of each.

Cuffs: I chose no cuffs but some like cuffs as useful for putting pew/ liturgy/hymn sheets in.  (cant’ see it myself).

 

 

Thanks to Twitter @PeterDaviesWorc, @maggidawn, @frsimon for info!

*May not be definitive.

Images from J&M Sewing.